Daily Archives: March 30, 2012

Cubase 5 – Studio Professional Edition

Cubase 5 comes with fully integrated new tools for working with loops, beats and vocals, combining with new composition features to take musical creativity to new heights. With stunning innovations and additional enhancements that boost productivity and performance, Cubase 5 represents the absolute cutting edge in digital audio workstations. Features include: Beat Creation and Loop Mangling use the included LoopMash, Groove Agent One, or Beat Designer to lay down a groove or mix it up; Vocal Editing and Pitch Correction use VariAudio to transcribe the vocal line, or fix it with PitchCorrect to create the perfect vocal take; New Dimensions for Your Mix all-new flexible and transparent automation handling try the new REVerence, the first VST3 multi-channel convolution reverb processor; Next-Generation Performance and Faster Workflow 64-bit support and low latency makes for high performance and smoother workflow; More Creative Compositional Tools work with the Ultra-Intuitive VST Ex

Songs For Swingin’ Lovers By Sinatra,frank (cd)

*Artist: SINATRA,FRANK *Genre: Vocals *Release Date: 8-SEP-1998

Country Boy By O’donnell,daniel (cd)

*Artist: O’DONNELL,DANIEL *Genre: Vocals *Release Date: 28-OCT-2008

Green Day Rock Band – Wii – Nintendo Wii Value Games

Green Day: Rock Band puts players on stage as multi-platinum selling and Grammy Award winninggroup Green Day, featuring the band s most-defining albums and key moments throughout theircareer to date. Players perform vocals, guitar, bass and drums using award-winning Rock Bandtechnology. 3D visuals and archival material give players a unique view into the music andvision of this pioneering band.

Let Our Fame Be Great

The jagged peaks of the Caucasus Mountains have hosted a rich history of diverse nations, valuable trade, and incessant warfare. But today the region is best known for atrocities in Chechnya and the 2008 war between Russia and Georgia.In Let Our Fame Be Great, journalist and Russian expert Oliver Bullough explores the fascinating cultural crossroads of the Caucasus, where Europe, Asia, and the Middle East intersect. Traveling through its history, Bullough tracks down the nations dispersed by the region’s last two hundred years of brutal warfare. Filled with a compelling mix of archival research and oral history, Let Our Fame Be Great recounts the tenacious survival of peoples who have been relentlessly invaded and persecuted and yet woefully overlooked.

The audible past

The Audible Past explores the cultural origins of sound reproduction. It describes a distinctive sound culture that gave birth to the sound recording and the transmission devices so ubiquitous in modern life. With an ear for the unexpected, scholar and musician Jonathan Sterne uses the technological and cultural precursors of telephony, phonography, and radio as an entry point into a history of sound in its own right. Sterne studies the constantly shifting boundary between phenomena organized as “sound” and “not sound.” In The Audible Past, this history crisscrosses the liminal regions between bodies and machines, originals and copies, nature and culture, and life and death. Blending cultural studies and the history of communication technology, Sterne follows modern sound technologies back through a historical labyrinth. Along the way, he encounters capitalists and inventors, musicians and philosophers, embalmers and grave robbers, doctors and patients, deaf children and their teachers, professionals and hobbyists, folklorists and tribal singers. The Audible Past tracks the connections between the history of sound and the defining features of modernity: from developments in medicine, physics, and philosophy to the tumultuous shifts of industrial capitalism, colonialism, urbanization, modern technology, and the rise of a new middle class.A provocative history of sound, The Audible Past challenges theoretical commonplaces such as the philosophical privilege of the speaking subject, the visual bias in theories of modernity, and static descriptions of nature. It will interest those in cultural studies, media and communication studies, the new musicology, and the history of technology.