Tag Archives: Southern Lord

Lord Boris Pink Product Type Compact Disc Perfect Heavy Metal Music

Track Title. 1 Farewell. 2 Pink. 3 Woman On The Screen. 4 Nothing Special. 5 Blackout. 6 Electric. 7 Pseudo-Bread. 8 Afterburner. 9 Six, Three Times. 10 My Machine. 11 Just Abandoned My-Self. On first listen to Boris’ Pink (domestically issued on Southern Lord), longtime fans of the Japanese heavy metal trio would be pressed to say that they crafted it for American audiences. This is significant to be sure. On the opening track, “Farewell,” one can hear so many un-Boris-like traits — a bit of Ride and My Bloody Valentine here, a bit of Isis (who were influenced by Boris!) there, a trace of Sigur R s, Nadja, and Jesu, too — that one wonders if this is a send-up spoof that’s proof that they can do it better. Even if that’s so, it’s only a part of this glorious slab of din and rock-is-power’s puzzle. Takeshi (bass, vocals), Wata (guitar), and Atsuo (drums, vocals), have not followed in the footsteps of their younger countrymen Mono in crafting dramatics and dynamics, as evidenced by the title track which follows. If anything, this is raucous, riffing speed metal married to the garage rock trash aesthetic of Guitar Wolf. Here is where Atsuo’s rim shots match in triple-time the low-string, down-tuned, freakzoid riffing of Wata’s and the pure squalling throb of Takeshi’s bass wail. Fuzzed out, ripped and torn and shredded riffs and propeller kit work take Boris to an entirely new level of “heavy.” The rootsy metallic thrash of the band outdoes anything they’ve done before — “Woman on the Screen” sounds like Iggy Pop fronting the MC5 of Kick Out the Jams in the Sunn 0))) era — all in two-minutes-and-thirty-eight seconds. Speaking of Sunn 0))), “Blackout,” a crawling, plodding, menacing scree of distorted bass and bluesy high-string electric guitar, is a track reminiscent of their earlier records, like Absolutego from 1996 — and may have influenced their American counterparts.

Lord Artist Sunn O Monoliths & Dimensions Rock Pop Heavy Metal

Track Title. 1 Aghatha (17:34). 2 Big Church (09:43). 3 Hunting & Gathering(Cydonia) (10:02). 4 Alice (16:21). Sunn 0)))’s Greg Anderson and Stephen O’Malley began their career as an Earth cover band, and explored the extremes of the low-tuned electric’s guitar’s drone capability at maximum volume on The Grimmrobe Demos. Later albums, such as 2005’s Black One, showed the duo expanding its sonic extremes, engaging a deep love of black metal by adding shrieking, growling vocals by Wrest, as well as additional instruments (like drums) by Oren Ambarchi. Altar, their collaboration with Japanese rockers Boris, provided them with a wider textural and ambient canvas to explore. Their vinyl-only release D mkirke, recorded in a 100-year-old cathedral in Norway, utilized the building itself as an instrument, where its nooks and crannies echoed back microtones of the band’s own high-powered drones on tape. That said, nothing could have prepared listeners for the wide-ranging adventure that is Monoliths and Dimensions. This 53-minute set contains four tracks. O’Malley and Anderson utilize more guests and collaborators than ever before, including vocalist Attila Csihar, who gives his greatest performance since Mayhem’s De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas; Ambarchi; Earth’s Dylan Carlson; trombonists such as jazzman Julian Priester and the Deep Listening Band’s Stuart Dempster; trumpeter Cuong Vu; multi-instrumentalist Steve Moore; male and female choirs; other reed and wind players; and violist Eyvind Kang as an arranger. While Sunn 0))) sound exactly like themselves, they seem to approach the music of composers such as Arvo P rt and John Cage; they utilize the former’s tintinnabuli (three bells) theory as well as engage the latter’s notion of silence as a process. If all this sounds pretentious, think again about who we’re talking about: the kings of wearing black hooded robes to perform.